Tour France: The Must-Eat French Foods


Anyone who has toured France will tell you that it has some of the best food in the world, without question. But with so many dishes to try, it’s sometimes difficult to know where to start! We’ve given you a list of Bliss Travels‘ favorite French foods to get you started. Do you have some favorite meals of your own? Let us know if you agree!

1. Fougasse

This bakery good is a specialty of Provence. With a focaccia-like texture and height, the fougasse has several deep cuts which allow the toppings to infuse their flavor throughout the bread. This could be anything from olives to fresh vegetables to ham and cheese.  Our favorite is une fougasse gratins, which is filled with chopped bacon. The bacon fat gives it an incredible crunchy crust and more flavor than one would ever think to find in an inauspicious loaf of bread–marveilleux!

The shape varies with each bakery that makes it, but every one is delicious!

The shape varies with each bakery that makes it, but every one is delicious!

2. Duck- Canard

The French rarely “do” beef. Instead, they specialize in what we would consider “alternative proteins”– and boy, do they do them well! Duck in France is incredibly tender, with a rich, buttery, and unique flavor that simply can’t be copied. In general, the French do not complicate this dish- it will be cooked perfectly and served with potatoes and perhaps some sauteed vegetables. They know a good thing when they have it! The Burgundy region especially has a reason to brag– clients who tour France with us are always ecstatic about this dish!

With a drizzle of balsamic oil and sauteed vegetables, this is divine!

With a drizzle of balsamic oil and sauteed vegetables, this is divine!

3.  Lamb- Agneau

Speaking of these “alternative proteins,” French lamb is consistently out of this world. One of the reasons these meats are so incredible in France is the way they were raised. Lamb roam the countryside, literally dining on herbs de Provence. Thus, they are flavored with rosemary, thyme and the like –naturally! Raising animals using methods that are considered “organic” in America, with fewer hormones and better quality food– they raise happy lambs! Any version of lamb you get will be to die for. Bliss Travels‘ favorite place is in a small bistro on the Left Bank of Paris, which specializes in an mouth-watering shoulder of lamb for two!

A shoulder of lamb for two? S'il vous plait!

A shoulder of lamb for two? S’il vous plait!

4. Napoleon- Millefeuille

This classic French pastry is crumbly, messy, almost always falls on your lap, and is totally worth it. It has gained notoriety across the world, but France is still the clear winner when it comes to making it. Literally– it’s name in French means, “1000 sheets/layers). And so true! Layers and layers of flaky pastry are interspersed with creamy custard, finished with a distinctively patterned top glaze. Parfait!

Does it get better than this?

Does it get better than this?

5. Any and All Breads- Tous les Pains!

Nothing in France opens before 10 AM, with the exception of the local bakery. And they certainly give you a reason to wake up early–the open storefront fills the street with the heavenly and comforting scent of warm bread. Most of the time, you can find the nearest bakery by following your nose! Baguettes and brioche are always great options. If you feel like branching out, try something with olives or noisettes (nuts), or pain aux cereales, which has whole grains and an pleasant texture.

How can you choose?

How can you choose?

6. Warm Goat Cheese Salad- Salade du Chevre Chaud 

This is a summer favorite! A simple, fresh bed of lettuce provides the counterpart to the the tangy, partially melted goat cheese served on toast that surrounds it. Light and refreshing, yet completely satisfying, every restaurant has their own spin on this dish, usually using local goat cheese. Whether in Provence, Paris, Burgundy or Bordeaux, this is always a great option. As it is summer, a glass of rose is essential to finish off the meal–bien sur!

Fresh bread, fresh goat cheese...what's better?

Fresh bread, fresh goat cheese…what’s better?

7. Chocolate Lava Cake- Chocolat Fondant

This is France’s gift to the chocoholics of the world. America has tried to copy this classic dish by dousing it in sugar, but the French know that the chocolate should take center stage. Here, the cake is made using dark chocolate, butter…and that’s about it. Rich and almost bitter, these tiny cakes will almost assuredly make you put your fork down after the first bite to shout a happy, “Mon Dieu, c’est incroyable!”

This is perfection.

This is perfection.

8. Melon and Prosciutto

Going without this dish on a trip to France is like visiting America without getting French Fries. It is a staple in the spring and summer months, especially in the Provence region, and starts off just about every good meal. The prosciutto’s smooth, mellow flavor is always appreciated. But the melon is what steals the show! The trick here is to look for “Cavaillon” melons, which is the Provencal town where they are grown. These are to die for!

The perfect blend of sweet and savory.

The perfect blend of sweet and savory.

Feeling inspired? Come with Bliss Travels to taste your way across France! Our spring and summer trips to Provence are the perfect opportunity to try Cavaillon melon at it’s finest, while our upcoming September trip to Burgundy gives you a chance to sample the heartier fare of the wine region!

A bientot-

Bliss Travels

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Holiday Vacation in Paris: Paris Pastry, Party & Holiday Treats

Holiday Vacation in Paris: Paris Pastry, Party & Holiday Treats

The LA Times wrote about Paris pastries, and I am quoting below, because this is the time of year we start to think of sweet treats –the holidays are approaching and we are busy planning so that our holiday travelers experience the best of that Paris has to offer in the form of sweats and treats.

“The next time you’re in Paris, drop your concern about carbs and surrender to sugar. The jewelry-like pastries these top-tier tastemakers turn out make it worth putting aside your intestinal fortitude for a bit of heaven.

Pierre Hermé: In this chic shop on Rue Bonaparte in the St-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood, a serious discussion is taking place between a well-dressed Frenchwoman in her mid-40s and the store clerk. The salesperson is inquiring about what cuisine and wines the hostess will be serving, the purpose of the occasion and even the dress code.

After gathering all the information he deems necessary, the merchant makes his recommendations. The hostess affirms his choices with a brief nod and, with gloved hands, he removes a selection of macarons from their place in the case and places them gently in a round box with orange piping that says simply, “Pierre Hermé.”

Pierre Hermé is one of several famous patisseries in Paris that have become well known for their macarons — a delicate cream-filled cookie with a crisp outer shell. Part of what has made these macarons so popular, despite their price tag of about $2.50 each, is the unusual flavor combinations, such as Arabesque, with apricot and pistachio; Mogador, made from passion fruit and milk chocolate; and Magnifique, a combination of strawberry and wasabi.

One of the top pastry chefs in Paris, Pierre Hermé has managed to marry the dense taste of an exotic cake with the light crunch of a sugar cookie — creating nothing short of a macaron movement.”

Bliss Travels Review: What I find most interesting are the places they chose to write about. Among them are Pierre Herme and Gerard Mulot, two renown pastry chefs with quintessential Left Bank shops. You certainly don’t want to miss the pastries at either. I’m surprised though that no mention was made of Pierre Herme’s “2000 feuille”. What we commonly call a “Napoleon” –a pastry confection piped with caramel and vanilla cream –is one of his best treats. The “real” name for this is Mille Feuille (thousand sheets/leaves). This refers to the paper thin layers of pastry that are piled below, between and above the filling. Chef Herme’s is called 2000 Feuille –an obvious nod to his opinion (accurate) of his pastry and its delicacy. So, all of this is by way of saying that the LA Times sure found some hot spots…Pierre Herme is no slouch. But, they didn’t find some of the best kept secrets in Paris pastry. (Or maybe they did but they didn’t want to publicize the places and change the nature of what they made and how they made it.)

 

The places we most enjoy frequenting, in addition to what the LA Times mentions are the little shops with small production of what can only be described as a cross between a gastronomic feast and a work of art. 

Whether they are items that are color coordinated for the holidays, double as decoration, or are little jewels packed with astounding flavor, as only the French can do, we encourage you to explore and try them all. They are a feast for the eyes as well as the mouth. The experience is Bliss! So, plan your pastry extravaganza through Paris, or come with us!

Christmas Tastings….In Paris

How do you spend Christmas in Paris? From the culinary perspective, that is!

First, you must visit the markets for the seasonal treats.And, of course, visit the best pastry shops! We led a pastry and chocolate tasting to taste some of the best of what Paris has to offer….ho ho ho!After walking through the shops and munching on things like millefeuille, lemon tart, madeleines, candied chestnuts, and more, we took a stroll through  the Luxembourg Gardens and St Sulpice. Then we relaxed in our own private lounge, sipping real Hot Chocolate and sampling artisan pastries and a selection of 5 different chocolates and caramels.Of course, we also had “real meals”! Hope you all have a very Merry Christmas. We will. We’ll be dining in a cozy traditional bistro on French fare such as oysters, foie gras, scallops, truffles, lamb, bass and duck…What are your favorite holiday dishes to dine on if you are away for the holidays?

What says “Christmas” to you when you sit at your table? And, what would you try if you were in Paris –during the holidays or any time?